Recipe: Honeybiscus Cooler

by Elizabeth Sullivan June 24, 2016 1 Comment

Recipe: Honeybiscus Cooler

After posting this photo to Instagram and bringing the iced tea to our knitting picnic last week I got lots of requests for the recipe, so I'm sharing it here today. Honeybiscus cooler is a real summertime treat in my house. Enjoy!

ingredients-for-honeybiscus-cooler-recipe

Simple ingredients make a refreshing iced tea

If you're lucky enough to have a hibiscus plant with edible flowers you can collect and dry your own flowers to use in this recipe. Otherwise try your natural food store, loose-leaf tea store or Latin American grocer (look for flor de jamaica) to find this pretty and tasty ingredient.

The recipe makes a concentrated syrup which can be diluted to taste. I've found a 1 to 3 or 1 to 4 ratio is about right for my taste.

Ingredients

  •  5 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 cup dried hibiscus flowers
  • 1 1/2 - 2 cups honey
  • 1 cup fresh squeezed lemon juice (about 4 lemons)

Directions:

  1. In a saucepan combine cinnamon sticks with 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil and then simmer for 10 minutes.
  2. Remove from heat, add hibiscus flowers and steep, covered, for 30 minutes.
  3. Remove lid, strain juice. Add honey and lemon juice.
  4. To serve, dilute with water to desired strength and add ice.

Makes approximately 4 cups of concentrated syrup, 16-20 cups diluted.

Honey and hibiscus iced tea

Honeybiscus cooler and a good book. My idea of a perfect afternoon!





Elizabeth Sullivan
Elizabeth Sullivan

Author


1 Response

Carolyn
Carolyn

June 24, 2016

First thing I’m going to do next week when I get home is make a batch of this! I have everything but the lemons! Thank you for sharing!

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