Recipe: Cranberry Scones

by Elizabeth Sullivan November 27, 2016 2 Comments

Recipe: Cranberry Scones

One of the best things about fall is fresh cranberries. I use them in all kinds of things like bread, muffins, smoothies, and applesauce, but this cranberry scone recipe is a particular favourite.

Breakfast at my house is usually granola and yogurt or toast and peanut butter, but a couple of weeks and I had family visiting so I got up early to make these scones for everyone. They are also delicious with a cup of tea in the afternoon if you're not a morning person!

Cranberry scones ingredients

Ingredients

  • 3 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp baking soda
  • 1/2 tsp salt
  • 3/4 cup cold butter
  • 1 cup fresh cranberries, coarsely chopped
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans
  • 2 tsp finely grated orange peel
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tbsp milk
  • 1 tbsp sugar
  • 1/4 tsp cinnamon

Directions:

  1. Preheat oven to 400°. In a large bowl, combine flour, 1/2 cup sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt. Stir to blend. With a pastry blender or two knives, cut in butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. Stir in cranberries, walnuts or pecans, and grated orange peel.
  2. Mix buttermilk in with a fork just until dry ingredients are moistened.
  3. On a floured surface, roll or pat dough out into a 3/4-inch thick circle. Cut into rounds with a 2 1/2-inch cutter. Place rounds on a large greased baking sheet, about 1 1/2 to 2 inches apart. Brush with milk. Combine 1 tbsp sugar and 1/4 tsp cinnamon; sprinkle a little of the mixture over each scone.
  4. Bake for about 15 minutes, or until lightly browned.

Makes 12 large scones.

Big and mini cranberry scones on baking tray

I like to make some large and some mini scones, but don't put them quite as close together as I did here since they will spread a bit. To prevent them from spreading too much, make sure your butter is cold and work quickly so that the dough is not too warm already when you put it in the oven.

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Elizabeth Sullivan
Elizabeth Sullivan

Author


2 Responses

Lucie
Lucie

November 27, 2016

I love scone and cranberries. I had my own recipe but I will certainly try yours as orange and cranberries are a mix made in heaven. Thank you,

Andrea L-J
Andrea L-J

November 27, 2016

Yummy! You have inspired me to make some g-f, d-f ones. I will start with this recipe amd use some fresh cranberries amd suger-cinnamoj on top as you suggest. https://spoonwithme.com/2014/01/20/gluten-free-dairy-free-cranberry-scones/

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